How to change brake pads and rotors

How to change brake pads and rotors.

Brake pads & rotors are considered wear items and as such, need to be replaced regularly. For track cars or race cars, the brakes must be changed even more frequently than street cars. My most recent brake upgrade is for my 1994 BMW 325is track car. Not too long ago, I purchased a set of Hawk DTC60 track pads and Stoptech slotted rotors. The upgrades will not only improve braking, but also survive the abuse of track driving. Since track driving generates extra heat during heavy braking, having upgraded pads and rotors is a must. The e36 generation BMW is fairly old these days, so changing brake pads & rotors is not quite as straightforward as some newer cars. This video covers how to change brake pads and rotors on my BMW, but it will apply to most cars out there on the market today. Interested in the parts I got for my e36 BMW? Check out the image links below!

Hawk DTC60 front brake padsHawk DTC60 rear brake padsStoptech right rear rotorStoptech left rear rotorStoptech right front rotorStoptech left front rotor

e36 brake upgrade

Improving my BMW’s on track performance with an e36 brake upgrade.

Brake upgrades are often overlooked when it comes to modifying a car. However, they are also one of the most important upgrades you can do. Especially, if the car has already been modified for more power and faster speeds! This becomes even more important if the car is a track day car or race car. In that case, upgraded brakes is a must. Not only for safety, because a weak brake system will not stop the car after a few hot laps. But, also for performance and reliability. For this phase of my e36 brake upgrade process, I have picked up a new set of high performance rotors and brake pads. I went with Stoptech slotted rotors front and rear, as well as Hawk DTC-60 brake pads. This combo should provide the stopping power I need while also being consistent lap after lap.